Click2Science Crosswalk of Standards

Click2SciencePD resources are designed to help out-of-school time program staff build skills for facilitating quality STEM learning in their programs. By using our resources, out-of-school time practitioners will be able to help youth learn and practice many of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

Providing opportunities for out-of-school staff to obtain professional development using Click2SciencePD can build their skills to support youth in fulfilling math, science, and language standards. The tools below are designed to help afterschool staff, directors, and curriculum specialists understand how Click2SciencePD helps staff facilitate learning that meets CCSS and NGSS standards.

Example of How to Use the Crosswalk

Step 1: Identify CCSS/NGSS Standards

For example, suppose that some of the youth in your program are interested in how airplanes fly. You can make the most of their interest and help them build science, math, and language skills. To do so, you can use the CCSS and NGSS Standards Chart below to identify standards that correspond with the subject and learning experience. Understanding and learning about how airplanes fly could include the following practices and skills from the CCSS and NGSS Standards Chart:

  • Math (CCSS): M2, M4, M7
  • English (CCSS): E1, E2, E3
  • Science/Engineering Practices (NGSS): S2, S3, S4, S6
  • Disciplinary Core Ideas (NGSS): Earth space science content, physical science content
  • Crosscutting Concepts (NGSS): 2, 3

Depending on how youth explore and learn about flight and airplanes, there might be connections with other standards and practices.

Step 2: Identify Click2SciencePD Skills to Practice

Youth could explore this subject by reading about flight, making model airplanes, testing their models, making notes in science journals, and sharing the results. Staff could consider all of the skills in Click2Science in Set 1 from the Click2SciencePD Crosswalk Chart.

Using Table 2, staff can consider which of the 20 Skills that Make STEM Click can help them facilitate youth learning for a standard identified in Table 1. They would want to consider how to select curriculum and/or activities, prepare themselves by understanding the science and engineering practices, maximize the space, create a safe space, and perhaps invite community partners to participate.


CCSS & NGSS Standards Chart

Below you will find a listing of math, science, and English language practices and skills which the CCSS and NGSS standards are based on. The table also shows the connection between math, science, and English language arts from CCSS, NGSS, and the National Research Council science and engineering practices. The table lists the Crosscutting Concepts and Disciplinary Core Ideas from NGSS. These concepts are fundamental to both CCSS and NGSS.

CCSS

Common Core State Standards (CCSS)

Math Practices CCSS Standards English Language Arts (ELA) CCSS Standards
M1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them E1. Demonstrate independence in reading complex texts, and writing and speaking about them
M2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively E2. Build a strong base of knowledge through content rich texts
M3. Construct viable arguments and critique reasoning of others E3. Obtain, synthesize, and report findings clearly and effectively in response to task and purpose
M4. Model with mathematics E4. Construct viable arguments and critique reasoning of others
M5. Use appropriate tools strategically E5. Read, write, and speak grounded in evidence
M6. Attend to precision E6. Use technology and digital media strategically and capably
M7. Look for and make use of structure E7. Come to understand other perspectives and cultures through reading, listening, and collaborations
M8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning  

NGSS

Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

Science and Engineering Practices NGSS Standards Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI) Crosscutting Concepts
S1. Ask questions and define problems Earth space science content 1. Patterns
S2. Develop and use models Life science content 2. Cause and effect: Mechanism and explanation
S3. Plan and carry out investigations Physical science content 3. Scale, proportion, and quantity
S4. Analyze and interpret data   4. Systems and system models
S5. Use mathematics and computational thinking   5. Energy and matter
S6. Construct explanations and design solutions   6. Structure and function
S7. Engage in argument from evidence   7. Stability and change
S8. Obtain, evaluate and communicate information    
Source: Next Generation Science Standards. June 2013. http://www.nextgenscience.org and Common Core State Standards. June 2010. http://www.corestandards.org

Click2SciencePD & Standards Crosswalk Chart

Below you will find each of the 20 Skills that Make STEM Click, a description of the skill, the CCSS and NGSS related standards and how you can use Click2Science to support learning and practicing the standards.

The following information is provided to help afterschool practitioners understand the connections between the C2S skills and the science standards. Providing appropriate hands-on, inquiry based activities can help students become confident in their skills as well as strengthening their science and engineering identity. Quality STEM learning will include opportunities to learn science and engineering practices in a safe learning space with staff who are comfortable in their skills and willingness to learn with youth in their programs.

Skill Set 1: Planning STEM Learning Experiences

Name of Skill Description of Skill Using C2S to support CCSS and NGSS
1. Selecting STEM Activities

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to select STEM activities that suit their program setting and their students’ interests, experiences, and needs.

  • Rate how well a given STEM activity allows youth to learn from hands-on explorations and connect STEM experiences to their daily lives
  • Assemble sources of STEM activities for out-of-school programs
  • Determine if STEM activities are well designed and suited to the unpredictable environment of out-of-school learning and to their specific program’s structure and needs.

 

After learning to select STEM activities staff can seek activities that support youth in learning and using science and engineering practices.

Staff can find out what topics youth are studying in school and select activities that will support that topic and allow them to explore the topic in different ways than they might do in the classroom.

Staff could select activities that help youth learn the Crosscutting Concepts.

 

2. Preparing yourself to facilitate STEM

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will be comfortable facilitating STEM activities with youth.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Understand that science learning begins with play and moves toward disciplined practice
  • Understand that scientific knowledge is constructed by real people who learn about the world by applying the rigorous processes of science and engineering with creativity and imagination
  • Identify and employ strategies to create an environment of co-inquiry and learning together with youth
  • Identify and employ strategies to use when youth ask a science-related question.

 

Afterschool staff that are prepared to facilitate STEM learning will be able to support youth as they explore STEM and construct their scientific knowledge along with youth.

Staff can be prepared to be co-learners with youth and explore topics of interest to youth which support what youth are learning in school.

Staff who are prepared can help youth learn to ask good questions and use science and engineering practices to support academic topics as well as youth interests.

3. Maximizing Your Space

 

Purpose:  Frontline Staff and Volunteers explore strategies for arranging their environment to maximize youth engagement

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Support students through the scientific process, encouraging trial and error in STEM learning environments
  • Promote a mutually respectful, relaxed, supportive environment that is characterized by encouraging new ideas and supporting different perspectives.
  • Model ways to give and receive constructive criticism, resolve conflict, and make mistakes
 
4. Connecting with Community Partners

Purpose: Frontline Staff and Volunteers will create a space that is safe, engaging, and welcomes student’s individuality.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Support students through the scientific process, encouraging trial and error in STEM learning environments
  • Promote a mutually respectful, relaxed, supportive environment that is characterized by encouraging new ideas and supporting different perspectives.
  • Model ways to give and receive constructive criticism, resolve conflict, and make mistakes
 
5.Connecting with Community Partners

 

Purpose: Frontline Staff and Volunteers will seek out community partners and utilize their strengths in STEM to enhance programs.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Identify shared goals and develop partnerships with STEM-rich local business/industry
  • Connect youth to community through service learning projects of local interest that promote STEM inquiry
  • Seek out and invite local community partners to engage in their program, providing support to community leaders to encourage working with youth
 

Skill Set 2: Interacting with Youth During STEM

Name of Skill Description of Skill CCSS and NGSS related standard Using C2S to support CCSS and NGSS
6.Sparking Interest in STEM

 

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to foster interest, wonder and excitement in STEM.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Describe how sparking interest influences youth motivation and engagement in STEM learning experiences.
  • Identify strategies and examples of sustaining interest and engagement in STEM learning.
  • Facilitate activities that spark interest in understanding science concepts and developing science and engineering process skills.

 

  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4.  Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts

 

  1. Some youth may love math and have an interest, they could share their interest with other youth in the program.
  2. Provide activities that might spark interest in STEM topics. Exploring by using the science and engineering practices will build skills and potentially spark interest, too.
  3. If youth share an interest by speaking or writing a story, their enthusiasm might spark interest in other youth. Staff could encourage youth with a passion for a topic to share their interest by sharing a collection or talking about the interest. This would provide practice speaking and perhaps writing.
  4. Exploring content areas of interest to youth can spark interest in STEM. Having materials available to explore can provide opportunities that may spark an interest. Including discussions about earth space, life and physical science topics can spark interest.
  5. Reviewing crosscutting concepts with youth may spark some interest in exploring a topic. Or if youth are creating a model or structure for classwork, some interest might be sparked and discussion of the concepts could be included in daily conversation
7. Connecting to Prior Knowledge and Experiences

 

Purpose:   Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to effectively connect STEM activities to the knowledge and experiences (culture, gender, SES, language and daily experiences) of the youth in their program.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Develop strategies to assess the prior knowledge, context and experiences youth bring to STEM learning.
  • Identify needs and interests that are relevant to youth in their program and can serve as access points to engage the youth in science activities.
  • Portray science as a real, social, lived experience that is relevant to youth.
  • Connect STEM learning to current events/issues and community concerns.
  • Connect afterschool STEM activities to what youth are learning in school as well as their lived experiences in their family, community and world.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. Assess prior knowledge and experiences with the 8 mathematical practices before providing STEM learning experiences to help youth learn and practice and of the 8 abilities. Older youth or those with proficiency in mathematical practices can teach younger and/or less proficient youth and staff about mathematical practices. Help all to learn the skills and persevere in problem solving.
  2. Assess prior knowledge and experience related to science and engineering practices; provide opportunities to learn and practice science and engineering skills.
  3. Writing and speaking activities can provide an opportunity to assess youth skills and knowledge of science, engineering, content, crosscutting concepts and math knowledge and skills. Assessment of ELA skills could be done with science notebooks or posters.
  4. Assess prior knowledge of content areas; provide opportunities to explore content and for youth to share ideas with each other.
  5. Assess prior knowledge of crosscutting concepts; provide opportunities to learn and practice concepts.
8. Embracing Active STEM Learning

 

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will understand that in active STEM learning youth generate knowledge which results in them learning and retaining more.   Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to facilitate active STEM Learning experience that engage youth.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Recognize expressions of curiosity and sense making and utilize them to enhance STEM learning experiences.
  • Facilitate inquiry learning experiences that allow youth to be creative and curious as they explore phenomena in meaningful ways.
  • Facilitate individual and group discussions that result in learners connecting ideas and generating their own understanding.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. Engaging youth in using manipulatives such as blocks can be an active, appealing, and concrete way to learn about math concepts
  2. Recognizing curiosity or inquisitive questions from youth about topics that could be explored with science or engineering could be supported in after school programs.
  3. Providing youth with opportunities to write about STEM topics and sharing their ideas with parents, other youth or staff can be an engaging activity to support youth in embracing their STEM learning. They may want to write a short book to share their explorations, projects or experiments.
  4. Typically youth are very interested in earth space science, physical and life science. They want to know about the world around them. Attentive staff can engage and support youth in exploring ideas of interest.
  5. Crosscutting concepts are evident in the natural world. Staff can learn to facilitate inquiry experiences and discussions.
9. Giving Youth Control

 

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will employ effective strategies to engage youth in STEM learning by providing opportunities for youth to direct and manage their own learning.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Describe the impact of self-determination, goal setting and decision making in preparing youth to be active learners, users and contributors to the fields of science and engineering.
  • Provide youth with a role in determining what is learned, when it is learned or even how it is learned.
  • Encourage exploration and creativity in all youth as they engage in STEM activities.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. No direct connection to math standards. Youth that enjoy math could share their expertise and understanding by helping other youth learn.
  2. Provide opportunities for youth to learn and practice science and engineering practices. Youth can determine the topics of exploration and methods to learn about the subject. Posting science and engineering practices will help youth become familiar with the skills.
  3. Provide opportunities for youth to use ELA to share their interests in STEM learning. Writing in science journals, creating posters or signs to share what they have learned may be ways to creatively share and build ELA skills.
  4. Staff can help youth to determine or identify content areas of interest and provide opportunities for them to explore their interests.
  5. Crosscutting concepts could be included in discussions of various experiments and/or explorations. Staff can learn about the concepts and include them in discussions as youth explore and experiment.
10. Group Management During STEM

 

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will employ effective strategies to manage group and individual behavior of youth during STEM activities.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Identify how the structure, environment and interactions between youth and adults contribute to youth behavior and learning.
  • Develop strategies for creating a safe and inclusive environment for learning.
  • Develop strategies for engaging youth in cooperative teams and developing their skills in working together.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. No direct connection
  2. After school staff should consider group management and find ways to support all youth as they participate in STEM learning activities. Being certain to provide opportunities for all youth to participate and be engaged.
  3. Grouping could be done using colors, words or other ways that would require youth to read and/or listen. This could provide opportunities for practicing skills and team work.
  4. No direct connection
  5. Grouping youth for activities could be done using math. Youth could lead the grouping and practice math skills in a concrete manner.
11. Asking Purposeful Questions

 

Purpose:   Frontline staff and volunteers will effectively utilize purposeful questioning and feedback to increase youth learning in STEM.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Identify how asking youth purposeful questions and providing feedback can lead to increased STEM learning.
  • Develop questions that are effective for enhancing STEM learning in their activities.
  • Utilize purposeful questions, follow-up prompts and wait time to improve STEM learning experiences.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. Developing questions to help youth think through math problems
  2. Learning to ask purposeful questions can support youth as they learn and improve their science and engineering skills.
  3. Staff can learn to ask purposeful questions and help youth learn to ask thoughtful questions of each other as they explore STEM topics. These skills will support ELA skills and abilities.
  4. Questions can be explored which are related to the DCI. Staff can think about potential questions as they plan DCI related activities.
  5. Questions can be explored which are related to the crosscutting concepts. Staff can think about potential questions as they plan STEM activities.
12. Encouraging Collaborative STEM Work

 

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will understand that collaboration and interaction are necessary in science and engineering learning experiences and be able to effective facilitate collaborative STEM learning experiences.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Describe the value of collaborative efforts in terms youth can understand and provide real world examples.
  • Portray science as a collaborative effort that involves groups of people working together to solve problems and build explanations of the natural world.
  • Facilitate STEM activities in which youth develop the skills to collaborate and cooperate effectively.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. Problems can be solved in a collaborative manner, with youth completing math puzzles together and helping each other build math skills.
  2. Science and engineering practices include collaborative work. When offering STEM activities staff can build in teamwork and collaboration to help youth build their skills.
  3. Collaborative STEM work could include team presentations of projects or structures built. Such presentations could include speaking, listening and writing to build on ELA skills.
  4. Exploration of the natural world can be done in a collaborative manner. Activities can be structured to include teamwork and examples of real life scientists can be included in activities.
  5. Learning about the natural world and exploring the related crosscutting concepts can be done in a collaborative manner. Learning to support each other’s learning, observations and findings can be built into STEM learning opportunities.
13. Making Authentic Assessments of STEM Learning

 

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to evaluate what is learned by youth before, during and after STEM activities.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Develop strategies to formally or informally evaluate the knowledge, engagement attitudes and skills of youth during and after learning experiences.
  • Use information collected about what youth understand and are able to do to make decisions about their teaching and plan learning experiences
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. Authentic assessment of math learning could be demonstrated if youth help each other learn math concepts or processes.
  2. Authentic assessment could be done using science and engineering practices if youth share their results and conclusions of a project or experiment with other youth, staff and/or parents.
  3. Authentic assessment could be demonstrated by development and presentation of a poster to youth, staff, and/or families. Including a Q & A session would support speaking and listening skills in addition to STEM learning.
  4. Staff could work with youth to determine methods to demonstrate what they have learned about topics related to DCI.
  5. Staff could work with youth to determine methods to demonstrate what they have learned about topics related to crosscutting concepts.
14. Reflecting and Processing STEM Experiences

 

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will deepen understanding and personal meaning making for youth by facilitating opportunities for reflecting on and processing of STEM learning experiences.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Facilitate STEM activities that develop understanding of STEM concepts and develop science and engineering process skills.
  • Develop strategies and questions that encourage youth to reflect on what they have learned and develop a personal understanding of STEM concepts.
  • Guide discussions that help youth make sense of what is happening during STEM activities and understand the science and engineering process skills being developed.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. Math is including in STEM processes. Developing strategies to help youth learn and practice math skills will facilitate both math and STEM learning.
  2. Learning to reflect and process STEM experience relates directly to the science and engineering practices. Staff can build their skills in the practices.
  3. Youth can keep a science journal to make notes about their reflections and STEM processes as they explore, experiment and consider engineering projects. Writing about their observations and ideas about their interests can help youth become comfortable with writing and reflecting on their work.
  4. Staff can develop strategies and questions to support learning about the DCI content. Guiding discussions about solar energy, for example would support youth’s reflection and processing skills.
  5. Guiding youth discussions to understand a structure they are building or function of a piece of technology are examples of how staff can help youth reflect and process STEM experiences and learn crosscutting concepts.

Skill Set 3: Building STEM Skills

Name of Skill Description of Skill CCSS and NGSS related standard Using C2S to support CCSS and NGSS
15. Supporting Testing and Re-Testing

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will facilitate STEM learning experiences that encourage youth to test, redesign and optimize their ideas and to accept and learn from failures.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Understand the importance of persistence in learning and develop strategies to help youth understand that success in STEM comes from effort, attention, practice and persistence
  • Develop strategies to encourage youth and support them as they try out new skills with imperfect results and reinforce the understanding that scientists and engineers make mistakes and learn from their failures.
  • Facilitate activities that encourage youth to test, redesign and optimize their ideas in science and their solutions in engineering.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. Testing and re-testing are great ways to use math in a practical manner by recording and charting results of various tests, then comparing results to identify the best result and perhaps determining why the results varied.
  2. Testing and re-testing are part of the science and engineering practices and staff can learn how to support youth in learning this critical skill and provide opportunities to practice.
  3. Youth can practice explaining results and how testing might be done differently to improve results. Thinking about testing, retesting and redesigning can provide opportunities to speak, listen and write.
  4. Exploring physical science can provide many opportunities to test and re-test. Helping youth to observe and explain their conclusions or ideas and plan next steps will help build skills and understanding.
  5. Exploring crosscutting concepts can provide many opportunities to test and re-test as well as redesigning prototypes. Staff can develop strategies to help youth think about how to re-test and/or redesign.
16. Modeling Science and Engineering Processes

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will facilitate opportunities for youth to apply the practices of science and engineering as they investigate questions, solve problems, and develop explanations.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Describe the practices of science and engineering in terms youth can understand.
  • Facilitate science investigations:  including opportunities for youth to ask questions, define problems, collect data and construct explanations.
  • Facilitate methodical problem solving:  including defining problems, generating and evaluating solutions and developing models or prototypes.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. Science and engineering processes include math concepts and standards. Staff can provide activities to explore STEM interests of youth while learning and practicing math skills.
  2. Staff can learn to describe science and engineering practices in ways that youth can understand and give youth opportunities to learn and practice skills.
  3. Staff can include opportunities for youth to read, write, speak and listen when youth are exploring and sharing what has been learned in STEM activities.
  4. Exploration using science and engineering processes can focus on learning DCI content.
  5. Staff can use science and engineering processes to explore and learn crosscutting concepts.
17. Helping Learners Develop and Expand Explanations

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will facilitate opportunities for youth to construct and critique explanations (science) and design solutions (engineering), and collect and interpret data to support their explanation or design solution.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Encourage youth to develop, refine and share their scientific explanations and design solutions.
  • Facilitate activities in which allow youth to describe what they are doing and what they are thinking about to others.
  • Facilitate activities that encourage youth to ask questions, collect data, interpret data, solve problems, test assumptions and communicate their ideas to others.
  • Model practices of science and engineering such as testing assumptions, requiring evidence, seeking alternative ideas and evaluating arguments.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. Staff can help youth learn to collect and interpret data, solve problems, and test assumptions. All of these help develop and use math skills. Youth can be encouraged to share and explain their work and what has been learned.
  2. Staff can help youth practice sharing observations, conclusions, etc. which will support them in this skill as well as strengthen their science and engineering skills. Encouraging youth to retest or try experiments with a slight variation and watch for variations is one way to support expanding learning.
  3. When youth are provided opportunities to share by speaking or writing about their STEM activities they will be able to develop explanations about their STEM activities. Staff can ask youth about what they have learned. Asking open ended questions or can encourage youth to expand their responses.
  4. Staff can provide activities for youth to explore the natural world and explain what they observe. Providing supplies for journaling or drawing pictures about what is observed or done can offer opportunities for expanding explanations.
  5. Staff can provide opportunities to learn about crosscutting concepts while practicing methods to explain, such as asking questions, collecting data, interpreting data, etc. Abilities learned in this skill can be applied directly to crosscutting concept learning.
18. Developing Science and Engineering Identity

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will support youth in viewing themselves as someone who learns about, uses and sometimes contributes to science – someone who has a personal identity as a science learner.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Describe real-world benefits for youth in developing a personal identity in science and engineering because they understand how youth will benefit from learning about, using and contributing to science and engineering now and in the future.
  • Identify strategies for engaging youth in science and engineering and developing a positive attitude toward science.
  • Facilitate STEM activities that engage youth as learners, users and contributors to the fields of science and engineering.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. If staff provide STEM activities supporting science and engineering practices youth will be learning and honing their math skills and reasoning abilities. This will support confidence in their skills and STEM identity.
  2. Providing STEM activities for youth to learn and practice science and engineering skills will support youth in developing a STEM identity.
  3. Staff can provide opportunities for youth to write and speak about their STEM learning. Opportunities to share what has been learned can support development of a STEM identity.
  4. DCI content provides many opportunities to find areas or topics of interest to youth. Allowing youth to select topics to explore will support them in developing a science and engineering identity. They will be excited about learning and will build confidence.
  5. STEM activities which explore crosscutting concepts are real-world topics and can provide opportunities for engaging activities. Youth can build their skills, content knowledge, and strategies to learn. Such activities will support a positive attitude about STEM and their abilities.
19. Supporting Documentation of STEM Learning

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to foster the use of a variety of documentation strategies in STEM learning experiences.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Understand the importance of conveying STEM concepts in multiple formats; particularly using symbols, drawings, models, diagrams, charts, tables, text or non-verbal means.
  • Identify strategies to foster use of a variety of documentation strategies.
  • Connect the process of documenting data, observations, inferences and conclusions to real-world scientific processes.
  • Connect the process of documenting design ideas, sketches, testing results and design solutions to real-world engineering processes.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. Youth can chart data and observations of an experiment or explorations. Staff can talk with youth about how engineers and scientists would use these techniques in their work. For example, testing and re-testing of prototypes may include math computations.
  2. Staff can provide opportunities for youth to make posters, draw pictures, write in a notebook, etc. to show youth how their STEM learning might be documented. Including youth in documentation of STEM learning helps them direct their learning and build science and engineering skills used by scientists and engineers in their daily work.
  3. Staff can support youth in documenting STEM learning by use of science notebooks, pictures, drawings, models, etc. Youth can share what has been learned and explain their documentation. Asking youth what they would do differently or what they might explore next can provide additional support for ELA and demonstration of what has been learned.
  4. Staff can provide activities for youth to explore DCI content and document related STEM learning. For example, youth might make a poster about a science experiment about plant growth.
  5. Documenting learning about crosscutting concepts can be done in many ways including posters, documenting data collection or other observations. Learning about crosscutting concepts could be demonstrated by sharing a structure or piece of technology that was built or created, such as a robot.
20. Making Connections to STEM Careers

Purpose:  Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to present STEM career pathways and the practical application of basic STEM skills that professionals use on a day-to-day basis.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Describe a range of STEM career pathways with youth.
  • Identify options that youth have as part of the future STEM workforce.
  • Introduce STEM role models that relate to the real world of the youth including gender, race, class and ethnicity.
  • Connect real-world STEM skills to activities they are facilitating.
  1. Math standards
  2. Science Standards - Science and engineering practices
  3. English Language Arts
  4. Disciplinary core ideas (DCI)
  5. Crosscutting concepts
  1. There is no direct connection to learning skills in the standards for this C2S skill.
  2. However, inviting STEM professionals to visit an after school program can help youth understand how the various standards are connected to real-world careers. Staff and youth can ask visiting STEM professionals about the various skills from the standards and how they are used in the work of the STEM professionals.